How to prepare your family to survive and thrive in todays uncertain world

Prepping For a Big Family Is Impossible!

pile of cans 300x195 Prepping For a Big Family Is Impossible!Sometimes I’m a bit jealous of how easy some others have it when prepping. If you think of a couple with a kid or two, how easy it must be to put stuff away!

As many of you know, life isn’t quite so easy when you have a big family. You have to start thinking in thousands of pounds, not hundreds of pounds. Hundreds of gallons instead of tens of gallons.

And then there’s the problem of where to put it all. Have you ever figured out where to put ten 55 gallon drums for your water storage? Ever run the calculations on how much that weighs? (Hint: it’s 2.3 TONS)

Have you ever seen how much room eight bug out bags take up? The hall closet just isn’t an option anymore.

When we buy a whole cow, it covers our beef needs for six months. That same cow would feed a ‘Standard American Family’ for over a year.

The list goes on and on … And I know most of you can relate.

But interestingly enough, even though some of the logistics change, the processes don’t. The basics don’t either.

Putting in supplies is a math problem at the heart of it. X amount per person per period of time. Multiply by the number of people.

The concept of starting small and working your way up doesn’t change. You may just have to go a bit slower. Get two weeks worth of food put away instead of a month at first.

You’ll eventually get to where you want to be, and as long as you’re making progress, you’ll be fine. Step after step.

Don’t feel discouraged by what other people can do. As long as you’re making progress towards your own preparedness goals, that’s what’s important.

Don’t feel discouraged because other people have more done. Do what you can, make constant progress, however small that progress is. You’ll get there.

Like I said, at the end of the day it’s a numbers game. Whether it’s just you and your spouse or you, your spouse, and your twelve kids.

The basics don’t change. Just the size of the pile of food…

pixel Prepping For a Big Family Is Impossible!

6 Responses to Prepping For a Big Family Is Impossible!

  1. And don’t forget about all of your long lost friends and family that will show up teotwawki+1. :)

  2. Tom Usher says:

    On the other side of the coin, you’ve got a small army of workers with a big family. They can produce far more than they can consume if you have to live in a self sustaining manner. Twp people can barely keep themselves alive. Too much to do efficiently.

  3. Donna says:

    This is why the best move all around is to be self-sustaining. Instead of storing chicken in cans, store the chicken (and the eggs) in chickens. Same with beef (in the cattle), milk, cheese, and butter (in the cow), fruit (in the orchard), veggies (in the trees), honey (in the hive)… Well, that’s the general idea. If we can do this, our food reproduces itself. Unfortunately, I’m not in a place right now where I can be self-sustaining, but I’m working while I’m waiting…and praying. Thank you for being such an encouragement to your readers. Blessings!

  4. Carol says:

    We have a large family, well, maybe not quite as large as yours but I know where you are coming from. My friend and has become a distributor for a food storage company. That has saved us a TON of money since purchases through her are discounted. Check out srmarketplace.com. They have a nice selection of items in #10 cans and even in 6 gallon buckets. We find the food tasts much better than the other companies out there.

  5. Lefty Prepper says:

    Ah yes, but if two is one and one is none, there are advantages to large families as well! Along with having more workers you also have more people who can develop different skill sets. Not as useful when all the kids are young, but a huge benefit long term. You can also realize some economies of scale unavailible to the single or small unit. I can’t store #10 cans, for example, because in a power down situation my three person group would have to eat just that can for two-three meals to not have food go bad. You also have more support for if something happens to one person. You’ve mentioned one of your kids has hemaphilia; with five kids if he gets cut, you can have two kids tending him, the last kid tending the baby, and you and your wife both still free to load the shot gun and blow away zombies. In my three person group if the epileptic has a seizure it can take two people to tend them, leaving exactly zero to fend off zombies.

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